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geology mixes music

1967 Part 2

so here is my 1967 granite mix. actually it’s the 1st one cos i’m planning a 2nd one. this one contains tracks that largely fit into the rock/pop bracket that could at least potentially have charted and most of them did. i’ve tried to make it a varied mix. some of the tracks i heard at the time (i was 13 that year) but there’s quite a few which i didn’t get to hear until later on. a couple of them i’d never heard until i thought of putting them on the mix.

i mentioned in the last post that musically 1967 was a crucial year for me. let’s face it i could pick out any year around then and say the same thing and put together many more mixes. the crucial thing i’m talking about is what’s emphasised in this mix. it was the year when afro-american artists came to the forefront. these artists had been around for a while especially if you’d been into early rock’n’roll or been a blues fanatic. the artists that had taken centre stage in the british music scene had come out of those people but they had then taken over and dominated and to be fair in their turn influenced the afro-american artists. but in 1967 things turned around and it seemed quite sudden that there was music that you could dance to without looking stupid. not that i did then. well if i did i don’t remember it.

i know that sergeant pepper’s and the previous year’s pet sounds were massively influential and i was certainly still listening to some british and white american bands but they didn’t get to me like the music coming out from detroit, memphis, muscle shoals etc

so anyway the 2nd mix will be any type of music that was released in 1967 and probably won’t have much that could have charted in it.

i’ll write a bit as usual with added links about the tracks on the mix. the setlist is below all this text and that’s where you’ll find the button that plays the music.

actually i haven’t got a lot to say about most of these artists. there’s not really that much point about re-hashing information gleaned from the web and i haven’t got a vast library of literature on the subject and the library’s been closed for weeks now. but i’ve gathered together a number of clips where i could of archive footage from 1967 or around then. here’s the one for booker t and the m.g.’s

i wasn’t aware at the time of the late sixties of the electric prunes but i’ve put them in the mix as something a bit different and they were ground-breaking in their own way.

my brother or my sister (possibly both) had a nina simone album back around this time so she was definitely one of the artists that i’m talking about above.

the incredible string band were more in my life a few years after in the early 70s. i can’t say i was ever that much into them but most people i knew then who were trying to play music seemed to be imitating them and could play many of their songs. i never learnt any of them but often played along to other people playing them.

and it was a few years after the late sixties that i first started listening to james brown. i knew the name from the temptations song sweet soul music where he was denoted as the king of them all. it always seemed strange to me that he was the king and yet his music wasn’t that widely heard. he didn’t actually get into the uk top ten until 1986 (and that was the only time he did) although he did get to number 13 in 1966 but i was only 12 and i missed it.

and similarly i was unaware of the velvet underground until the early 70s.

but tramp was one of those songs that made me think about things back then. there had been male/female duo songs before from artists like sonny & cher but this was different. it was like real life instead of some fantasy bullshit. and it swung. sorry no clip for carla thomas only otis.

back in 1967 frank sinatra’s music wasn’t anything that particularly interested me but i could feel its strength. strangers in the night had been a huge hit in 1966. i can’t recall hearing any of the album with jobim at the time but later i came under jobim’s influence like so many others.

if i was to choose a favourite soul artist from that era it would have to be aretha.

i learnt to play chapter 22 last year. i’ve always got to remember to start it slow enough. you can play it a bit quicker but then the bass riff at the end of each verse is harder to get right. ufo?

i’m sure that if samuel johnson had been alive in the late 1960s he would have said that if a person was tired of sly and the family stone then they were tired of life. but maybe bobbie gentry would have been more his thing.

maybe i should have saved the ivor cutler track for the next mix. the beatles’ magical mystery tour was broadcast on tv in december 1967 with ivor featuring as buster bloodvessel, the bus conductor. you probably already know that.

7 rooms of gloom by the four tops was another one of those songs that seemed to open things up.

you took the dream i had for us and turned that dream into dust i watch a phone that never rings i watch a door that never rings

i must admit it never occurred to me that maybe 7 rooms was a lot of rooms for a couple. maybe there were kids too. they’re not mentioned in the lyrics.

one rainy wish was released as the b side to up from the skies. that was the only single to come from the jimi hendrix experience’s 1967 album. the next single they released was a cover of the song that closes this mix.

according to wikipedia wilson pickett’s version of funky broadway was the first charted single with the word funky in the title.

dylan has written that when he performs all along the watchtower he feels that although it’s his own song he feels like it’s a tribute to hendrix.

Granite Mix 20
title artist album
Hip Hug-Her Booker T & The M.G.’s Hip Hug-Her
Wind-Up Toys The Electric Prunes Underground
Go To Hell Nina Simone Silk & Soul
Way Back in the 1960s The Incredible String Band The 5000 Spirits or the Layers of the Onion
Bring It Up James Brown & The Famous Flames James Brown Sings Raw Soul
All Tomorrow’s Parties The Velvet Underground & Nico The Velvet Underground & Nico
Tramp Otis Redding & Carla Thomas King & Queen
Dindi Frank Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim
Baby, I Love You Aretha Franklin Aretha Arrives
Chapter 24 Pink Floyd The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
Bad Risk Sly & The Family Stone A Whole New Thing
Shoplifters Ivor Cutler Trio Ludo
7 Rooms of Gloom Four Tops Reach Out
One Rainy Wish The Jimi Hendrix Experience Axis Bold As Love
Funky Broadway Wilson Pickett The Sound of Wilson Pickett
All Along The Watchtower Bob Dylan John Wesley Harding
Categories
geology mixes music quotations songwriting

Granite Mix IXX

It’s time for another mix. This one’s pretty random though manually so. Here’s a few comments about the tracks.

El Bachín was a bar in Buenos Aires, now demolished but the name has been transferred to another establishment. The little boy of Piazzolla’s song was called Pablo Alberto González. In an interview he said that his favourite part of the song is where it says “Dirty-faced little angel selling flowers in the skittles alley of Bachin fire at me with three roses the hunger I hear in you” (or something like that – not easy to translate). The interviewer asked “Do you know what it means?” The answer “No but I like it all the same.”

I haven’t really anything to say about Can’s track Vitamin C. It’s pretty well known and you may have heard it somewhere even if you don’t know anything about the band. Here’s a link to a video that Mute Records made to go with a re-release 3 years ago.

I first saw Carla Bley performing in, I think, 1975 when she was in Jack Bruce’s band. In fact she was the reason I went to see the band. I’ve also been fortunate to have been at a few gigs to see Charlie Haden including the one when they toured this material which was probably in 1983. That was at the Venue, Victoria, London.

Here’s a bit from an interview with Junior Wells from 1997 where he talks about his very early days as a musician.

Yeah. Well, Tampa used to play right down the street from where I was living on 22nd and Prairie. I couldn’t go any place, but I was just a kid. But I used to sit out front and listen to them. Johnnie Jones came out one night, he was playing keyboards then, and he hear me playing the harmonica. And he said, “Come on in the house”. I couldn’t go in cos Mrs. Jeffries wouldn’t allow it. He went in and told the people I was out there, and some people come outside. And they kept bugging Mrs. Jeffries about me coming in. So Mrs. Jeffries let me come in and I could play some. I had to go outside. Then, I started to bothering Tampa to get in some other places. And they started to let me take all the tips that the people was giving to me. I started hustling down and something like that. Then the other musicians, the older musicians, they started taking their time with me, too. I felt real groovy about it. You know, everybody seemed to be in my corner about helping me accomplish what I was trying to do.

I got into forró when I visited north Brazil a few years ago and Luis Gonzaga is one of the originators.

And to continue the Brazilian theme here is a song from Jorge Ben’s debut album which came out in 1963.

And now a bit of North Africa with Cheba Zahouania.

Here’s an excerpt from an interview with MF Doom from spin.com where he’s talking about his approach to writing lyrics.

I’m a rhymer, so I go for points. I ain’t going to be talking shit about the next dude, or bragging about shit I got. I talk broke shit, I talk about shit I don’t got, or things I’m striving for. Say you’re speaking from a point of view where you’re talking to yourself, in maybe a sad mood. How do your tones come across? Can people feel what you’re saying? Can they hear what you’re saying? Are you well pronounced? Maybe you purposely were a little bit sloppy with it, to bring the point across. Can you bring the point across and still get the rhyme points? It’s like gymnastics on paper.

James Brown’s 1st album from 1958 – James Brown and the Famous Flames that is.

I can’t say I know much about Macedonian folk music but I have managed to find a nice clip of Kostadin Gugov – I like this sort of home-made thing.

I know I’ve featured Ravi Shankar before – you can’t go wrong with a genius like that. And his name is linked to his official website where I see that a few weeks ago Dark Horse Records released the first ever vinyl version of his 1997 album Chants of India.

Poverty’s Paradise was the first hip-hop album to win a Grammy so it’s a bit of history too.

H.P.Lovecraft (the band that is) were only going for a couple of years in the late sixties. The link goes to a clip of them performing the song tbat’s in this mix on TV from 1968.

Finally, Beautiful Linda Getchell commemorates a sad story of unrequited love which is also alluded to in one of Fahey’s best known albums – the San Bernardino Birthday Party. You can read the story in Steve Lowenthal’s biography of the great guitarist. Only if you’re interested though.

Granite Mix 19
title artist album
Chiquilín De Bachin Astor Piazzolla Moderato Mistico
Vitamin C Can Ege Bamyasi
Introduction To People Charlie Haden / Carla Bley The Ballad Of The Fallen
Early In The Morning Junior Wells Hoodoo Man Blues
São João Do Carneirinho Luiz Gonzaga Sao Joao Na Roca
Quere Esquecer Voce Jorge Ben Samba Esquema Novo
Ala Lasmar Moul Khana Zahouania Golden Rai
Figaro Madvillain Madvillainy
Tell Me What I Did Wrong James Brown And The Famous Flames Please, Please, Please
Razturi Se Shar Planina Kostadin Gugov Macedonian Songs
Village Dance Ravi Shankar Tana Mana
Sunshine Naughty By Nature Poverty’s Paradise
I’ve Been Wrong Before H.P.Lovecraft H.P.Lovecraft
Beautiful Linda Getchell John Fahey The Transfiguration Of Blind Joe Death