Categories
birds geology mixes music

granite mix 6

Paul Bley‘s first album came out on Debut Records label. It’s DLP 7 – Introducing Paul Bley. Debut Records was a label set up by Max Roach, Charles Mingus and Mingus’s wife Celia. A brave attempt by artists to control the commercial aspects of their careers which also produced some classic music and highly collectable if you can afford the original vinyl. Here‘s some of the cover art including this album.

I’m not sure that any of the vinyl that Harold Budd‘s music is contained on has a lot of market value. I expect a few things might have. Luxa I have on cd and the only cds that will keep any sort of value will have very distinctive packaging. I guess this track is named after the Mandan tribe.

I know absolutely nothing about James Earle Hines but I’ve managed to find you a link if you’d like to know something.

The first Laotian music I heard was on BBC Radio 3 sometime in the late 70s and I taped the programme with it on. I may still have it somewhere but this is from a cd I got later. As a special treat I’m also embedding a youtube video to show how this sort of thing is created. You know I only give you the best.

Abraham Ellstein wrote only one opera – The Golem. I’d really like to hear that actually. According to Amazon it has been recorded but sadly it’s unavailable.

According to Wikipedia, Blind Lemon Jefferson recorded 79 songs over a 4 year period 1925-1929. He was in his early thirties and he died in 1929. He was a Texan. For me the greatest musician to come from Texas is Ornette Coleman, but Blind Lemon isn’t too far behind. He’d been playing as a professional musician since his teens and until his recording career happened mainly made his money as a busker although busking was probably a bit different then.

But boxing is and was my heart

Miles Davis : Miles The Autobiography

During the first few months of 1970 around the time of recording the soundtrack to Jim Jacobs’ documentary about the legendary boxer Jack Johnson, Miles named several tracks after some of his favourite boxers – Johnny Bratton, Sugar Ray (Leonard),(Muhammad) Ali, Archie Moore and finally the track featured here (Roberto) Duran, which rightly should be Durán, otherwise known as “Manos de Piedra” in his native Panama. This track is about 9 minutes long.

I was fortunate to see Dawn Upshaw once performing with the Kronos Quartet. Unfortunately her throat was bad and she could only sing about three pieces. Still I suppose that should be more valuable like a stamp that’s mis-printed.

Dock Boggs who is the subject of this superb song by Chicago band Califone was born on February 7 1898 and died on February 7 1971 on his 73rd birthday.

I had the craziest dream last night. An owl kicked its way under my blanket in the middle of the night and insisted that it needed to get warm. I’d never conversed with an owl before and I couldn’t really believe that it was telling the truth. Astrud, help me on this one. Could it have been a burrowing owl?

GZA Here’s a youtube link to one of his masterful 50 Cent disses which is nice because the words are given below the video. Sheer Genius.

One of the best gigs I ever went to was seeing David Rudder at the Fleece & Firkin in Bristol. He and his band were stupendous and it was a privilege to be able to see that in such a small and intimate setting. This track isn’t David Rudder but it was as a result of seeing him that I bought the record with this on. It turns out to be interesting in that Gypsy is Winston Edward Peters who is currently Minister of Community in the Trinidad & Tobago government. Couldn’t happen in Britain could it?

And then what do you know? More calypso, I didn’t really plan that. Lord Kitchener was an earlier generation though not the earliest of recording calypso artists. In 1942 he first recorded a song called Green Fig and supposedly Princess Margaret bought 100 copies of it. Maybe she bought 100 copies of lots of things though. I mean if you can afford it you may as well do it.

And finally John Coltrane‘s version of the lovely Irving Berlin song, Russian Lullaby. What more can I say?

here’s the mix

Granite Mix 6
Artist Title Album
Paul Bley The Theme Introducing Paul Bley
Harold Budd Mandan Luxa
James Earle Hines & His Goodwill Singers Get On Board Little Children Get On Board Little Children
Molam Lao Lam Pthuthay Music From Southern Laos
Abraham Ellstein Abi Gezunt Great Songs Of The Yiddish Stage Vol 1
Blind Lemon Jefferson Teddy Bear Blues Black Snake Moan
Miles Davis Duran Directions
Dawn Upshaw Stravinsky: The Rake’s Progress: No Word From Tom Knoxville – Summer Of 1915
Califone Dock Boggs Sometimes Good Weather Follows Bad People
Astrud Gilberto I Had The Craziest Dream Beach Samba
GZA 4th Chamber Liquid Swords
Gypsy Sing Ram Bam This Is Soca
Lord Kitchener Kitch In The Jungle London Is The Place For Me
John Coltrane Russian Lullaby Soultrane
Categories
crab micromuseum

Pinces d’or

Last year when I created a category which is called crab I pretty much knew right away what the 2nd post in the category would be. And here it is. Another book and another excuse for some more Tintin scans. The Crab With The Golden Claws was the first Adventures of Tintin book to be translated into English and published in the UK. (There I’ve said it.) That was in 1958 and indeed the copy I have has that first publication date though I think probably it was bought in 1960. By 1958 there were 19 possible books to choose from so it makes you wonder why Methuen chose to start with this one. Probably because it was the book that introduced Captain Haddock and they could see that this introduction took the series onto another level.

Here’s the contents of the pockets of a merchant seaman Herbert Dawes by name who was found drowned. There aren’t many deaths in the books and if it happens it’s usually off-scene as in this case. By the way the half crowns are all duds. On the back of the torn label from the tin of crabmeat Dawes has written the name of the boat he works on – Karaboudjan.

Crab01

On the left is Lieutenant Delcourt who is in charge of the outpost of Afghar, an excellent commander even though a heavy drinker. To his right stands Ahmed stalwart of the camel patrol corps.

Crab02

Because of various reasons related to the fact that the book was written during the middle of World War II the story is shorter than other previous ones. This resulted in the creation of some extra frames including 4 unusual full page frames. One of these is below. It illustrates Omar Ben Salaad returning home guided by a servant who from time to time calls out “Make way for the mighty Omar Ben Salaad”. A rich, rich man who owns a magnificent palace, great estates in the south (Spanish Sahara we’re talking about) and even a flying machine. He also wears a couple of golden crab’s claws round his neck. But he is in the sight of indomitable agents of law and justice. We don’t learn of his ultimate fate but I would have thought that great wealth may in the long term have managed to get the better of law and justice in Spanish Sahara in the 1940s. This is going beyond the remit of children’s literature.

Crab03

Categories
micromuseum

micromuseum 9

The micromuseum contains many good things. Riches and small mundane objects such as a couple of black and white prints that I instance in this post.

This is an ancestry category sub-section of the ever-increasing slowly circumferencing micromuseum.

The first is centred around a waterfall. A waterfall in Chile. I can’t say for certain but I’d wager my paltry fortune on it as that’s where my grandparents used to live. I can’t identify anyone on this photograph although I may have met some of them. Not many but maybe one or two.

It speaks of the wonder of the photograph. The realisation of what the ultimate image might look like. The nonchalant wave of the arm which was unthinkable in an earlier age of stationary posing.

Might be rather a dull afternoon. But some of our happiest times are dull aren’t they? Dull in the sense of boring that is. I’m not talking about the weather.

oldchile01

In this 2nd photograph I know that it is my grandmother sitting in the centre. The couple (presumably) who accompany her I do not know but maybe I could find out. Perhaps it’s best not to know. It might lead to trouble. In the long run. I’ve been for a long run and I know the consequences.

I assume my grandfather is a hidden presence in the scene as the taker of the picture. I wonder what he was thinking about.

oldchile02