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geology mixes music

1967 Part 2

so here is my 1967 granite mix. actually it’s the 1st one cos i’m planning a 2nd one. this one contains tracks that largely fit into the rock/pop bracket that could at least potentially have charted and most of them did. i’ve tried to make it a varied mix. some of the tracks i heard at the time (i was 13 that year) but there’s quite a few which i didn’t get to hear until later on. a couple of them i’d never heard until i thought of putting them on the mix.

i mentioned in the last post that musically 1967 was a crucial year for me. let’s face it i could pick out any year around then and say the same thing and put together many more mixes. the crucial thing i’m talking about is what’s emphasised in this mix. it was the year when afro-american artists came to the forefront. these artists had been around for a while especially if you’d been into early rock’n’roll or been a blues fanatic. the artists that had taken centre stage in the british music scene had come out of those people but they had then taken over and dominated and to be fair in their turn influenced the afro-american artists. but in 1967 things turned around and it seemed quite sudden that there was music that you could dance to without looking stupid. not that i did then. well if i did i don’t remember it.

i know that sergeant pepper’s and the previous year’s pet sounds were massively influential and i was certainly still listening to some british and white american bands but they didn’t get to me like the music coming out from detroit, memphis, muscle shoals etc

so anyway the 2nd mix will be any type of music that was released in 1967 and probably won’t have much that could have charted in it.

i’ll write a bit as usual with added links about the tracks on the mix. the setlist is below all this text and that’s where you’ll find the button that plays the music.

actually i haven’t got a lot to say about most of these artists. there’s not really that much point about re-hashing information gleaned from the web and i haven’t got a vast library of literature on the subject and the library’s been closed for weeks now. but i’ve gathered together a number of clips where i could of archive footage from 1967 or around then. here’s the one for booker t and the m.g.’s

i wasn’t aware at the time of the late sixties of the electric prunes but i’ve put them in the mix as something a bit different and they were ground-breaking in their own way.

my brother or my sister (possibly both) had a nina simone album back around this time so she was definitely one of the artists that i’m talking about above.

the incredible string band were more in my life a few years after in the early 70s. i can’t say i was ever that much into them but most people i knew then who were trying to play music seemed to be imitating them and could play many of their songs. i never learnt any of them but often played along to other people playing them.

and it was a few years after the late sixties that i first started listening to james brown. i knew the name from the temptations song sweet soul music where he was denoted as the king of them all. it always seemed strange to me that he was the king and yet his music wasn’t that widely heard. he didn’t actually get into the uk top ten until 1986 (and that was the only time he did) although he did get to number 13 in 1966 but i was only 12 and i missed it.

and similarly i was unaware of the velvet underground until the early 70s.

but tramp was one of those songs that made me think about things back then. there had been male/female duo songs before from artists like sonny & cher but this was different. it was like real life instead of some fantasy bullshit. and it swung. sorry no clip for carla thomas only otis.

back in 1967 frank sinatra’s music wasn’t anything that particularly interested me but i could feel its strength. strangers in the night had been a huge hit in 1966. i can’t recall hearing any of the album with jobim at the time but later i came under jobim’s influence like so many others.

if i was to choose a favourite soul artist from that era it would have to be aretha.

i learnt to play chapter 22 last year. i’ve always got to remember to start it slow enough. you can play it a bit quicker but then the bass riff at the end of each verse is harder to get right. ufo?

i’m sure that if samuel johnson had been alive in the late 1960s he would have said that if a person was tired of sly and the family stone then they were tired of life. but maybe bobbie gentry would have been more his thing.

maybe i should have saved the ivor cutler track for the next mix. the beatles’ magical mystery tour was broadcast on tv in december 1967 with ivor featuring as buster bloodvessel, the bus conductor. you probably already know that.

7 rooms of gloom by the four tops was another one of those songs that seemed to open things up.

you took the dream i had for us and turned that dream into dust i watch a phone that never rings i watch a door that never rings

i must admit it never occurred to me that maybe 7 rooms was a lot of rooms for a couple. maybe there were kids too. they’re not mentioned in the lyrics.

one rainy wish was released as the b side to up from the skies. that was the only single to come from the jimi hendrix experience’s 1967 album. the next single they released was a cover of the song that closes this mix.

according to wikipedia wilson pickett’s version of funky broadway was the first charted single with the word funky in the title.

dylan has written that when he performs all along the watchtower he feels that although it’s his own song he feels like it’s a tribute to hendrix.

Granite Mix 20
title artist album
Hip Hug-Her Booker T & The M.G.’s Hip Hug-Her
Wind-Up Toys The Electric Prunes Underground
Go To Hell Nina Simone Silk & Soul
Way Back in the 1960s The Incredible String Band The 5000 Spirits or the Layers of the Onion
Bring It Up James Brown & The Famous Flames James Brown Sings Raw Soul
All Tomorrow’s Parties The Velvet Underground & Nico The Velvet Underground & Nico
Tramp Otis Redding & Carla Thomas King & Queen
Dindi Frank Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim
Baby, I Love You Aretha Franklin Aretha Arrives
Chapter 24 Pink Floyd The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
Bad Risk Sly & The Family Stone A Whole New Thing
Shoplifters Ivor Cutler Trio Ludo
7 Rooms of Gloom Four Tops Reach Out
One Rainy Wish The Jimi Hendrix Experience Axis Bold As Love
Funky Broadway Wilson Pickett The Sound of Wilson Pickett
All Along The Watchtower Bob Dylan John Wesley Harding
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geology mixes music quotations songwriting

Granite Mix IXX

It’s time for another mix. This one’s pretty random though manually so. Here’s a few comments about the tracks.

El Bachín was a bar in Buenos Aires, now demolished but the name has been transferred to another establishment. The little boy of Piazzolla’s song was called Pablo Alberto González. In an interview he said that his favourite part of the song is where it says “Dirty-faced little angel selling flowers in the skittles alley of Bachin fire at me with three roses the hunger I hear in you” (or something like that – not easy to translate). The interviewer asked “Do you know what it means?” The answer “No but I like it all the same.”

I haven’t really anything to say about Can’s track Vitamin C. It’s pretty well known and you may have heard it somewhere even if you don’t know anything about the band. Here’s a link to a video that Mute Records made to go with a re-release 3 years ago.

I first saw Carla Bley performing in, I think, 1975 when she was in Jack Bruce’s band. In fact she was the reason I went to see the band. I’ve also been fortunate to have been at a few gigs to see Charlie Haden including the one when they toured this material which was probably in 1983. That was at the Venue, Victoria, London.

Here’s a bit from an interview with Junior Wells from 1997 where he talks about his very early days as a musician.

Yeah. Well, Tampa used to play right down the street from where I was living on 22nd and Prairie. I couldn’t go any place, but I was just a kid. But I used to sit out front and listen to them. Johnnie Jones came out one night, he was playing keyboards then, and he hear me playing the harmonica. And he said, “Come on in the house”. I couldn’t go in cos Mrs. Jeffries wouldn’t allow it. He went in and told the people I was out there, and some people come outside. And they kept bugging Mrs. Jeffries about me coming in. So Mrs. Jeffries let me come in and I could play some. I had to go outside. Then, I started to bothering Tampa to get in some other places. And they started to let me take all the tips that the people was giving to me. I started hustling down and something like that. Then the other musicians, the older musicians, they started taking their time with me, too. I felt real groovy about it. You know, everybody seemed to be in my corner about helping me accomplish what I was trying to do.

I got into forró when I visited north Brazil a few years ago and Luis Gonzaga is one of the originators.

And to continue the Brazilian theme here is a song from Jorge Ben’s debut album which came out in 1963.

And now a bit of North Africa with Cheba Zahouania.

Here’s an excerpt from an interview with MF Doom from spin.com where he’s talking about his approach to writing lyrics.

I’m a rhymer, so I go for points. I ain’t going to be talking shit about the next dude, or bragging about shit I got. I talk broke shit, I talk about shit I don’t got, or things I’m striving for. Say you’re speaking from a point of view where you’re talking to yourself, in maybe a sad mood. How do your tones come across? Can people feel what you’re saying? Can they hear what you’re saying? Are you well pronounced? Maybe you purposely were a little bit sloppy with it, to bring the point across. Can you bring the point across and still get the rhyme points? It’s like gymnastics on paper.

James Brown’s 1st album from 1958 – James Brown and the Famous Flames that is.

I can’t say I know much about Macedonian folk music but I have managed to find a nice clip of Kostadin Gugov – I like this sort of home-made thing.

I know I’ve featured Ravi Shankar before – you can’t go wrong with a genius like that. And his name is linked to his official website where I see that a few weeks ago Dark Horse Records released the first ever vinyl version of his 1997 album Chants of India.

Poverty’s Paradise was the first hip-hop album to win a Grammy so it’s a bit of history too.

H.P.Lovecraft (the band that is) were only going for a couple of years in the late sixties. The link goes to a clip of them performing the song tbat’s in this mix on TV from 1968.

Finally, Beautiful Linda Getchell commemorates a sad story of unrequited love which is also alluded to in one of Fahey’s best known albums – the San Bernardino Birthday Party. You can read the story in Steve Lowenthal’s biography of the great guitarist. Only if you’re interested though.

Granite Mix 19
title artist album
Chiquilín De Bachin Astor Piazzolla Moderato Mistico
Vitamin C Can Ege Bamyasi
Introduction To People Charlie Haden / Carla Bley The Ballad Of The Fallen
Early In The Morning Junior Wells Hoodoo Man Blues
São João Do Carneirinho Luiz Gonzaga Sao Joao Na Roca
Quere Esquecer Voce Jorge Ben Samba Esquema Novo
Ala Lasmar Moul Khana Zahouania Golden Rai
Figaro Madvillain Madvillainy
Tell Me What I Did Wrong James Brown And The Famous Flames Please, Please, Please
Razturi Se Shar Planina Kostadin Gugov Macedonian Songs
Village Dance Ravi Shankar Tana Mana
Sunshine Naughty By Nature Poverty’s Paradise
I’ve Been Wrong Before H.P.Lovecraft H.P.Lovecraft
Beautiful Linda Getchell John Fahey The Transfiguration Of Blind Joe Death
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geology jazz mixes music

Granite The Eighteenth

following on from my series of mixes dedicated to individuals here is one for thelonious monk and as usual i will write a bit about each track.

when he got a contract with riverside records in 1955 they thought it wise to start his album account with covers from the duke ellington songbook. this might have seemed insulting to someone who already had written a good number of classic bop tunes but monk liked the idea, saying later in an interview

i wanted to do it. i felt like playing that’s all. i knew that duke started playing some of his numbers more than he had as i recall

before the riverside contract he had been with prestige records and the second tune dates back to october 1951. toot was thelonious’ son’s nickname. art blakey was the drummer and gary mapp the bassist.

at the prestige session in november 1953 they were about ten minutes short of the material needed for an lp. it was friday 13 november and so that was used as the title of the composition that monk made up on the spot. listening to the track it’s fairly obvious to me why most critics dismissed the music back then. the music was way before it’s time and a lot of people thought they were playing like that because they couldn’t play properly.

brilliant corners brings us back to the riverside years to be precise 1956 and it was really the breakthrough album that started to bring a modicum of success and critical acclaim. the celeste that monk uses on the track happened to be in the studio and he set it at right angles to the piano keyboard so that he could use it on the heads and on his solo. of course the track is named after his famous rich patron pannonica de koenigswarter. the following is monk’s introduction to the track caught on a home recording some time.

it was named after this beautiful lady here. i think her father gave her that name because of a butterfly that he tried to catch. i don’t think he caught the butterfly.

in november 1957 there was a concert at new york’s carnegie hall which was a benefit for the morningside community center. as well as the thelonious monk quartet there was ray charles topping the bill, and also the bands of billie holiday, dizzy gillespie , zoot sims and sonny rollins. the concert was broadcast on the radio as a voice of america production. the recordings of the monk quartet were discovered in 2005 in the library of congress vaults.

ruby my dear started life as manhattan moods which was intially registered for copyright in 1945. sometime in the next year the name got changed. rubie richardson was an early girlfriend of thelonious’ but things didn’t work out. her parents never approved.

and so he eventually married nellie smith who he’d known since she was ten and he was sixteen. this tune dedicated to her was originally to be called twilight with nellie and it was nica who suggested using the french word instead. criss-cross now takes us to the columbia records years. the track was recorded on 29 march 1963 and the other musicians were charlie rouse on tenor saxophone, john ore on bass and frankie dunlop on drums.

underground is in my opinion the last great album he produced and the title refers to the nickname of his daughter this time

finally from halloween 1964 (or the evening after) the quartet with a new rhythm section larry gales bass and ben riley drums playing live at the it club. throughout his career monk was famed for his eccentricity but it seemed that around this time things were reaching a peak. here’s an excerpt from robin kelly’s thelonious monk biography which provides an example.

hampton hawes, who had not seen monk since he and nellie helped him out in new york, came by the it club one night to check him out. when hawes approached thelonious at the bar during a break, “he didn’t seem to recognise me. looked over my shoulder, elbow on the bar, staring into space the way he sometimes does…i said ‘monk it’s me, hampton’. he kept staring past my shoulder as if he hadn’t heard then turned his back and went into a little shuffling dance; danced a couple of quick circles around me, danced right up to me and said, ‘your sunglasses is at my new york pad.’ and danced away”

titlealbum
mood indigoplays the music of duke ellington
little rootie tootiethelonious monk trio
friday the 13ththelonious monk and sonny rollins
pannonicabrilliant corners
nuttythelonious monk and john coltrane at carnegie hall
ruby my dearsolo monk
crepuscule with nelliecriss-cross
boo-boo’s birthdayunderground
misteriosolive at the it club
Categories
geology jazz mixes music

17 gianter steps

embarrassed at not including any john coltrane in my earlier granite mix this year i thought i’d make amends by doing this new granite mix as a tribute to the great saxophonist. these are all tracks from albums that were released with coltrane as session leader or co-leader. the recording sessions come from the period 1957 to 1963. his first session as leader was in 1957 and his last session was in may 1967 two months before his death so it was a pretty incredible body of work to put out in 10 years.

Granite Mix 17
Artist Title Album
John Coltrane Body And Soul Coltrane Jazz
John Coltrane & Milt Jackson The Night We Called It A Day Bags And Trane
John Coltrane While My Lady Sleeps Coltrane (1957)
Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane Freight Trane The Kenny Burrell Quintet with John Coltrane
John Coltrane Aisha Ole Coltrane
John Coltrane Big Nick Coltrane (1962)
John Coltrane Naima Giant Steps
John Coltrane Theme For Ernie Soultrane
John Coltrane Alabama Live At Birdland

the first track was recorded on october 24th 1960 which was one of 3 days in a week where he was in the studio for atlantic records. the tracks recorded made up 3 albums and most of a fourth.

his first session for atlantic was in january 1959. a session that he co-led with vibraphonist milt jackson who he had played with earlier in the fifties in dizzy gillespie’s band.

before atlantic he was with prestige and this next track is from his first session as a leader. while my lady sleeps was a favourite ballad that he often quoted in his solos and is an early example of using a pedal point which became a major feature in his work later on.

then from a prestige recording session a year or so later which was led by guitarist kenny burrell who he also had played with when he was a sideman for dizzy gillespie. according to the sleeve tommy flanagan the pianist on the session was credited as writer of freight trane but he wasn’t and burrell himself has stated that he didn’t know who wrote it.

aisha was written by pianist mccoy tyner and named for his wife. the recording session for this album was the last session coltrane did for atlantic and in fact 2 days before he’d done his first recording for his new label, impulse and that date was a grander affair with a 20 man ensemble which came out on the africa/brass album.

this next track was not initially released on the album in fact it was recorded a couple of months before the main recording sessions for this record. but it features the classic coltrane quartet with elvin jones on drums mccoy tyner on piano and jimmy garrison on bass here playing coltrane’s homage to another saxophonist big nick nicholas.

just as the fifth track is named by mccoy tyner for his wife this seventh is named by coltrane himself for his wife. both women were from philadelphia and naima was a friend of aisha’s sister khadijah. it is one of his greatest compositions and the only one from the fifties that he was still playing live towards the end of his career.

another track with philadelphia connections in that it was written by guitarist fred lacey in memory of saxophonist ernie henry who died from a heroin overdose in 1957. In trying to glean information about this track i stumbled on an interesting article by bass player steve wallace who seems to have done a good bit of research on the subject.

on sunday september 15th 1963 a large explosion at the 17th street baptist church in birmingham alabama killed four young girls who were preparing for a church service and injured many more. ku klux klan members were eventually found guilty of planting the dynamite. they escaped justice for a long time thanks to an insidious web of corruption and racism that reached right to the top of the fbi. two months later coltrane went into the studio and recorded his dedication to the victims which was one of two studio tracks included with the three live tracks on the live at birdland album released by impulse the following spring.

granite 17

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geology mixes music Uncategorized

miles of granite

for the xvth granite mix i decided to feature the artist who i have most recordings of, miles davis – it’s a long mix – nearly an hour and a half. instinct led me from one track to another. here’s the mix and after it the details and then some comments on the tracks.

granite 15

Granite Mix 15
Artist Title Album
Miles Davis Mood ESP
Charles Mingus/Miles Davis Nature Boy Blue Moods
Miles Davis Nem Um Talvez The Complete Jack Johnson Sessions
Miles Davis Footprints The Bootleg Series Vol. 2 Live In Europe 1969
Miles Davis Pacific Express The Complete Miles Davis at Montreux 1973-1991
Miles Davis It Never Entered My Mind Workin’
Miles Davis Swing Spring Miles Davis & The Modern Jazz Giants
Miles Davis Johnny Bratton The Complete Jack Johnson Sessions
Miles Davis The Time Of The Barracudas Quiet Nights
Miles Davis Right Off In Concert

first of all one of my favourite tracks from one of my favourite albums. esp was the first album of what is known as the 2nd great miles davis quintet which was somehow a perfect band when this was recorded tony williams was 19 herbie hancock was 24 and wayne shorter was already doing some of the best writing that was going on in the mid sixties. ron carter was writer or co-writer of 3 tracks on the album including this one and they’re all good. after that he didn’t contribute any compositions to the following 5 albums he was involved with possibly due to the fact that he was an incredibly busy musician during the period he was with the quintet playing on over 50 recording sessions for albums with other artists.

back to 1955 for a track from a session that had problems according to miles in his autobiography

something went wrong at this session and nothing ever really clicked, so the playing didn’t have any fire. I don’t know what it was – maybe the arrangements – but something definitely went wrong…

but I’ve always enjoyed this track, written by proto-hippy eden ahbez, first recorded by nat ‘king’ cole, frank sinatra recorded a version in 1948 and it’s worth recording miles’ frequent assertion that his phrasing was heavily influenced by sinatra, although also worth bearing in mind that he gave a lot of credit also in this respect to charlie christian. as in another quote from the afore-mentioned book

charlie christian influenced my approach to the trumpet and also influenced the phrasing of frank sinatra and nat ‘king’ cole

next is one of 5 versions of this tune by hermeto pascoal that have been released, 2 from a session on may 27 1970 and 3 from a session shortly after on june 3 (although one of them ended up with a different title – selim). given that there were apparently at least 19 takes on the 1st session there could be a few other versions hanging round in the vaults. ian carr doesn’t even bother to mention the 2 that were released when he wrote his critical biography of miles and in paul tingen’s miles beyond he describes them as ‘ear-grating’. much as i like the latter book i find this opinion like a lot of tingen’s other critical opinions are not worth heeding.

the 1st of 3 live recordings in the mix is a version of a wayne shorter composition – probably his most famous. in the sleeve notes (written by josef woodard) to the set that contains the track there is the following quotation from an interview 20 years later with miles

you could tell what part of the note, what part of the sound you could play off of. wayne had some different, each run had. we used to play footprints and the way we were playing it, nobody else could play it like that except for me and wayne.

it’s july again only 16 years later. this is a john mclaughlin composition that was briefly in the setlist. there was an afternoon set and an evening set on the 14th – both long sets, over 2 hours. this track is from the evening set. a week later the band similarly played 2 sets in london at the royal festival hall – i’m pretty sure i was at the 2nd set. ian carr was also there with a backstage pass and he relates seeing miles at the end of the last set

as soon as he got down the two short flights of steps and out of the audience’s sight, two large men were waiting for him, and each grabbed an arm and supported him as he suddenly sagged and almost caved in

given that wayne shorter has already featured on 2 of the above tracks you would expect me to include at least one track featuring john coltrane but sadly this has not happened i didn’t plan it that way. this is the only track in the mix which was at the period of the 1st great quintet. but on this track chosen late at night reflectively the saxophone laid out.

this comes from another controversial recording session. some reports reckoned that there was a fight between miles and monk.

…i just told him to lay out when i was playing, because i wasn’t comfortable with the way he voiced his changes…i wanted to hear space in the music…so I just told him () to come into the music a little after i played. and that’s what he did. there wasn’t any argument…monk was a gentle person, gentle and beautiful, but he was strong as an ox. and if i had ever said something about punching monk out in front of his face – and i never did – then somebody should have just come and got me and taken me to the madhouse, because monk could have just picked my little ass up and thrown me through a wall.

i love all of these tracks that I’ve put on this mix. obviously. but this is another of the great sessions. i wish monk and miles had recorded more together. listening to this session was the 1st time i heard both of them and at the time monk knocked me out more than miles. his solos seemed to come from another mysterious dimension.

and johnny bratton is the 3rd appearance of john mclaughlin in the mix if you include his composition pacific express. recorded on february 27th 1970 this is the sort of thing that some people fail to understand. here’s a good clip that deals with this subject.

from an album reviled by the man himself but which nevertheless has some great moments. this tune was also recorded on the gil evans album the individualism of gil evans and miles got a co-credit for the arrangement. in the end that is a better track but he doesn’t actually play on it and despite the history taken in isolation this is a great track and there’s something actually quite unique about it. if they’d had time and money to complete the album properly this would be a masterpiece and maybe it is anyway.

finally another album written off by various critics or in my words vastly under-rated. when i first heard it back in the early seventies i immediately thought it was brilliant. to me it was great that the instruments were all levelled out in the mix and i assumed that this was deliberately done and i still do. producer teo macero wasn’t an idiot and they wouldn’t have put the record out if they hadn’t got decent quality recordings. it needs to be listened to loud ideally through headphones. with open ears and an open mind. carlos garnett on saxophone and cedric lawson on keyboards for example maybe didn’t go on to have brilliant careers but i don’t think they let the side down at this gig.

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fire geology mixes music quotations

Kool G Ran It For Teen

there isn’t really a theme to my 14th granite mix, but one thing i tried to do was to keep the tracks short. here’s the mix and after that a table with track listing and then some comments and links and stuff below that.

granite 14

Granite Mix 14
Artist Title Album
John Cale King Harry The Academy In Peril
Nino Rota Notturno O Mattutino La Dolce Vita – Soundtrack
Ralph Vaughan-Williams The Bell Ringers Epithamalion
Joseph Spence Lay Down My Sword & Shield Gospel At Newport
Larry Young Alive Lawrence Of Newark
Armando Trovajoli El Negro Zumbón hit song from film Anna
Captain Beefheart I Love You Big Dummy Lick My Decals Off Baby
Ahmad Jamal I’ll Take Romance/My Funny Valentine Ahmad Jamal At The Blackhawk
Howe Gelb Belly Of Fire Down Home 2002
King Curtis Cuban Twilight Have Tenor Sax Will Blow
Kool G Rap 4,5,6 4,5,6
Federico Mompou Impresiones Intimas No. 9 Gitano Impresiones, Scenes, Charmes, Fêtes Lointaines

the academy In peril is not a particularly well-known work in the john cale canon and is almost as famous for its record sleeve as it is for its music. unfortunately i don’t own a copy of the original album but have a later re-release which doesn’t have the half-gatefold with the cut-outs that the original had but I have seen that original cover in fact the 1st time i heard the album it was at a friend’s house near uxbridge or thereabouts maybe ruislip and he had the sleeve i remember it well. the other thing that is well known about the cover is that it would have been worth a lot more if it had been in black and white which is something that the song a dream from the lou reed/john cale album songs for drella teaches us.

a vast expanse of the roman countryside, to one side are the ruins of the san felice aqueduct, towering arches that come striding across the land. two thousand years ago those arches brought water to the city, but now there are many gaps where whole sections of the aqueduct have fallen in. directly in front is a soccer field, the goal posts dwarfed by the height of the aqueduct. in the distance the sound of motors is heard. a speck in the sky grows rapidly larger. it is a helicopter, and beneath it is a hanging figure. a second helicopter follows close behind. as the ‘copters pass over the field the figure suspended below can be clearly seen. a large statue of christ the labourer swings from a cable. the shadow of the ‘copter and this incongruous figure flashes across the walls of the aqueduct. the helicopters pass on.

federico fellini – screenplay for la dolce vita

why does ralph vaughan williams haunt me the way he does? Is it something to do with the ark tempers of medieval lines? who can tell in this age of imaginativeness?

as soon as i heard joseph spence’s take on utterance i was bewitched as if i had crossed several salt seas of despondency and come at last to fresh water.

at a certain time freedom mixed with sonority to produce several subversely subservient dramaturgy/diatribe/dialogue/dichotomy diptychs

el negro zumbón is complicated. usually attributed to silvano mangana she only mimed to the song in the film anna. it was written by italian composer armando trovajoli and the female singer is flo sandon’s

i’m grateful to samuel andreyev for his fascinating work on captain beefheart and the magic band – definitely one of the joys of youtube which despite my earlier diatribes i am overall in admiration for for its democratic all-inclusiveness. i certainly look forward to more from samuel.

maybe i’ve already written about the time i went to see ahmad jamal the only time i saw him but i’m proud to be able to say even that and if i haven’t written about it then no doubt i will repeat/not repeat it again in the future when my marbles start to lose their shine.

i’ve been to 3 howe gelb gigs but the 1st was something special. during the interval i was standing outside with my friend neil armstrong not the astronaut but maybe even greater in many ways. there was no-one else around and suddenly howe stepped out of the main entrance. he was about 40 metres away from us he looked around with a bewildered expression and then went back into the building. strange.

here’s a fantastic clip of king curtis

as a weather report fan in the mid-70s if i was to choose a favourite track mysterious traveller would be one of the top tracks in my opinion from that era and when i first heard 4,5,6 from kool g rap i recognised the sample straight away. it’s not one of the highlights of my hip-hop collection but is just in the end another of the great tracks that came out in the mid-90s an era that i have covered in the past.

finally what do i find so great about these gentle piano pieces that the catalan composer dreamed scored and deployed. apparently some say that there are superior representations of these pieces by more accomplished pianists than mompou was himself. to my mind who is going to interpret someone’s work better than that person themselves? i don’t know i just don’t get it.

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geology mixes music quotations

thirteenth granite mix

granite 13 is a mix i constructed some time ago late at night in a lively pensive mood. probably i don’t really remember. some of the artists have been on other granite mixes but that’s only to be expected. graphs show patterns and patterns evolve into branched out structures of growth replete with inner and outer significance. trellises draw stems and tendrils favour south-facing surfaces.

lotte lenya, best singer of all bond villains is my favourite interpreter of her husband’s music. sorry this track isn’t great quality it came tortuously originally from a radio broadcast – bbc radio 3 that would be.

nancy wilson i have talked about before and not sure what else i can say except that if you’re going to look at only one of the youtube links that i’ve embedded in this post then i would particularly recommend hers

bonnie prince billy i find a refreshing character i’ve chosen a video rather than a live perfomance for the link because i somehow think he works especially well with film.

ron goodwin wrote the music for seventy-odd films including four miss marple features with margaret rutherford in the lead role. i can’t find any full versions of those online but here’s a trailer.

balkan music has got a strong thing going with it’s mixture of asian and european traditions and this albanian unit is a good example of what i’m talking about. what am i talking about?

raekwon

my clan done ran from japan to atlanta with stamina
slingers and gamblers and gram handlers
tical light the owl cigar let’s get steamed
infra-red guard your beam

i’m not an expert on the blues but for me john lee hooker was the guy who took it a bit beyond and spaced it out by reducing the number of chords which is always good for me though i admit sometimes i fancy putting a few in.

alfred schnittke is another composer/musician that i have talked about before and not sure what else to say. how about – my favourite composer? at the moment anyway.

baden powell – probably talked about him too (when i say talked i mean written). and the link is the second best one to watch.

here’s the mix

granite mix 13
artist title album
lotte lenya september song from radio
nancy wilson i can’t stop loving you today, tomorrow and forever
bonnie prince billy the lion lair ease down the road
ron goodwin miss marple theme film music of ron goodwin
unknown albanian musicians unknown albanian song from radio
raekwon guillotine (swordz) only built 4 cuban linx
john lee hooker crawlin’ king snake the best of john lee hooker
alfred schnittke collected songs where every verse is filled with grief kronos quartet – early music
baden powell dindi poema on guitar
Categories
geology mixes music

Granite Dozen

I have finally managed to get all my digital music on one device, pretty much all anyway. That still leaves out a vast amount which is on vinyl although some of that has been digitised and is on the device though quality not brilliant. Anyway this task makes it easier for me to create a to some extent random mix and behold another exercise in granite-working.

I’ll ski on to the tracks.

Canção do Amor Demais is a beautiful album where lyricist Vinicius de Moraes and musician Antônio Carlos Jobim got Elizeth Cardoso to sing for them. A ground-breaking album from 1958 with fantastic arrangements by Jobim and I love Elizeth’s voice.

The Jon Hassell track is really just a short thing but if you want to hear more of his music here’s a link to about an hour’s music from a 7 year old gig.

Der Ruf der Rohrflöte is a very atmospheric piece. When I shove it into Google translate I find it means ’The reputation of the reed pipe’. I’ve got the DVD of Nosferatu but haven’t watched it for a while – I must soon and I will try and spot where this track occurs, it’s track 10 on the soundtrack but that may not mean anything.

On my first Granite mix which was back in December, 2011, Wayne Shorter was included with a track from this same album. It’s not my only album of his but it’s just coincidence. I’ve thought for a long time that he’s undervalued as to how great a composer he’s always been. A friend told me the other day she’d been to see him with the Lincoln Center Orchestra at the Barbican and it’s good to see that maybe he’s starting to get recognition – since he’s 82 now it’s about time.

The Sinatra song is from a film called Higher and Higher which came out in 1944. I couldn’t find a clip of him singing this song in the film but here’s a 5 minute snip and there’s another song so you get the feeling.

Granite Mix 1 also had a track from Gang Starr there’s nothing really strange about this I know but I’m still worried. Shame what happened to Guru, but Premier is still representing as you can see in this clip of his set 3 years ago.

Lani McIntyre is perhaps not as well known as some of the other artists nor probably ever will be but I certainly was happy to find this clip of him with his orchestra and a bunch of sweet dancing girls.

Robert Wyatt first started to develop the political impact of his songs and music around 1980 but the album that first drew that together, Nothing Can Stop Us in 1982 only had one song written by himself, Born Again Cretin which was his first stab at writing a political song (at least first made public). Three years later he brought out Old Rottenhat and he’d managed to crack it with some really strong material that dealt with politics in an outstanding way. The song included in this mix is just as relevant today.

Finally to accompany the last track I’ve found a lovely clip of Sooliman Ernest.

here’s the mix

Granite Mix 12
Artist Title Album
Elizeth Cardoso Luciana Canção do Amor Demais
Jon Hassell Camminavo Nella Strada Sulla Strada
Popol Vuh Der Ruf der Rohrflöte Nosferatu
Wayne Shorter Armageddon Night Dreamer
Frank Sinatra A Lovely Way To Spend An Evening Frank Sinatra In Hollywood Volume 1
Gang Starr Form Of Intellect Step In The Arena
Lani McIntyre Chimes Hawaiian Moonlight
Robert Wyatt United States Of Amnesia Old Rottenhat
S.E. Rogie Baby Lef Marah Palm Wine Guitar Music: The 60’s Sound
Categories
geology mixes music quotations

granite mix 11

I think I mentioned before that this mix was to be a mix of things I’ve recorded from the radio over the years. It’s not something I do any more I can’t imagine spending the time. But I used to starting in the late 60s. At first it was to quarter-inch reel to reel. Then it was onto cassette which was what I recorded most of my radio recordings. Later I started to use mini-disc but by then I’d already slowed down in my recording habits.

The quality of the tracks is not brilliant in that they were recorded off the radio mainly onto cassette then in some cases kept for many years then digitised so there’s some crackle a bit of buzz and probably cases where there’s a subtle pitch change. I have mainly tried to make them live recordings in the radio studio or out at a gig but they may not all be – well one’s part of a dj set, that’s sort of live but there’s a couple I’m not sure about.

Thomas Morley was organist at St Paul’s Cathedral and composed many madrigals. He almost certainly knew Shakespeare as they lived nearby and London wasn’t that big back then apparently. He certainly wrote music for one of the playwright’s songs in a famous play. I don’t know who wrote the words for this song they are good.

Sleep, slumb’ring eyes; give rest unto my cares,
My cares, the infants of my troubled brain;
My cares, surpris’d with black despair,
Doth the assertion of my hopes restrain.
Sleep, then, my eyes, O sleep and take your rest,
To banish sorrow from a free born breast.

My freeborn breast, born free to sorrow’s smart,
Brought in subjection by my wand’ring eye,
Whose trait’rous sight conceiv’d that to my heart
For which I wail, I sob, I sigh, I die.
Sleep, then, my eyes, disturb’d of quiet rest,
To banish sorrow from my captive breast.

My captive breast, stung by these glist’ring stars,
These glist’ring stars, the beauty of the sky,
That bright black sky which doth the sunbeams bar
From her sweet comfort on my heart’s sad eye.
Wake, then, my eyes, true partners of unrest,
For sorrow still must harbour in my breast.

From a live concert of Paco Peña one of my favourite guitarists accompanied by another guitarist whose name I don’t know unfortunately. And I don’t know enough to say what type of piece this is siguiriyas or what have you.

Next is The Chemical Brothers well sort of it’s more like The Beatles really but it was a great moment when I heard this Essential Mix set one Saturday night in about 1996. Really you need to have more context than I’ve given here.

I was fortunate to see Paco Peña roughly around the time of the earlier recording and that is also true of this track by Oregon. I’m sure that the set on the recording is pretty much the same set that they did when I saw them in December 1990 at Hope Chapel.

This song by The Fall is taken from a radio session on the programme Mixing It which must have been sometime in 2005. Midnight In Aspen is the story of a dying Hunter S Thompson. I’ve got a better Fall radio session from an 80s John Peel programme but later on I’m using another Peel session. Anyway this is better sound quality.

I can’t remember when I taped this concert by Tadao Sawai but he died in 1997 so it must have been before then. The wikipedia page I have linked to only lists 1 album to his name which can’t be right. There are fortunately 2 albums of his on Itunes and for slightly less than 15 quid you can buy them both. Actually I might just do that.

From a Lou Reed gig broadcast on the radio in about 199? this is a version of A Dream which has Lou doing the vocals rather than John Cale who did them on the album (Songs For Drella) and the filmed performance of the album. I believe the words are taken from Warhol‘s diaries which I haven’t read but I will buy the book one day – gee wouldn’t that be great?

The Schnittke has a very quiet beginning – it’s a short piece and it’s very beautiful in a crystalline way. Without having listened to a great deal of his music I admire him greatly and I have got the underlying philosophy of his work and in a way shamelessly appropriated it myself. I can’t tell for sure whether I’ve included a full work here or just an excerpt of one, but I don’t see it matters and I hope he would agree with me

The oldest recording is this John Peel session which I did not record when it was first aired in about 1971 but later in the 80s when it was repeated. This session was issued on vinyl I believe in the Peel Sessions series and later there was a cd. Both formats are quite rare now. Syd‘s Two Of A Kind was only known to be recorded on this show – you can also find this on a compilation.

Finally a 1991 live concert recorded at the Royal Festival Hall. This was part 1 of the encore. Keith Jarrett is a very serious man and musician.

here’s the mix

Granite Mix 11
Artist Title Comment
Thomas Morley Sleep Slumb’ring Eyes Unknown performers
Paco Peña Unknown See notes above
Chemical Brothers Chemical Beats/Tomorrow Never Knows Excerpt from Essential Mix
Oregon Unknown Live circa 1990
The Fall Midnight In Aspen Mixing It session
Tadao Sawai Unknown See notes above
Lou Reed A Dream See notes above
Alfred Schnittke Voices Of Nature? See notes above
Syd Barrett Two Of A Kind John Peel session
Keith Jarrett Somewhere Over The Rainbow See notes above
Categories
geology

Heavens Above We Can’t Hear What You’re Saying

I signed up to twitter.com recently not that I’ve got a lot of confidence in my handling of the social networking milieu. It’s always struck me that I could maybe do something with 140 characters perhaps it was a medium that suited my compositional abilities but until now I had resisted the urge to experiment.

I had the idea of using the channel to put up whichever elements of my work (that’s a grandiose way of putting it) Fool’s Gold would fit into the required format (number-of-characters-wise). The whole of this so-called work is already up on this website (geology category) so it’s sort of web-published already but I thought the tweet at a time method might work quite well for anyone foolish or presumptuous enough to follow me. Having taken another look at it though there’s not much that I’m prepared to use I get the feeling something specific is required and I’m trying to filter that to some sort of distilled doctrine.

In the meantime I’m only dipping in very slightly to the twitterverse. Trying to get my head round the ability it has to link me up with people who I know vaguely and haven’t seen for years – have I got an address book up in the sky now? It’s not like I do facebook.

I’m listening right now to some L Shankar that I taped off the radio years and years ago when I used to do that sort of stuff. It’s made me think that the next granite mix I do will be of tracks recorded from the radio. The quality is going to be a bit ropy but it should be a rewarding blend. Some of the most interesting things I ever taped were on quarter inch reel to reel and they disappeared a long time ago sad to say. All is transitory whilst simultaneously being permanent some might say.